By CATHI AYCOCK

If you think of the 1970s as the era of bad design trends (polyester leisure suits and avocado appliances) you are not alone.

The 1970's are often referred to as the decade of bad design. Harvest gold appliances, knotty pine paneling and mosiac linolium anyone?

The 1970s are often referred to as the decade of bad design. Harvest gold appliances, knotty pine paneling, and mosaic linoleum anyone?

Many circa 1970 designs, in the realm of both fashion and home, don’t stand the test of time. Let alone shine like a classic jewel.

Which is why the home featured in Behind Closed Doors is practically unheard of. A home, built in the’70s, that has dozens of design elements that homebuilders today cite as must-haves making it feel classic and beautiful today.

Original to the circa 70's home, the vaulted ceiling, beams, stacked stone fireplace and soaring windows are elements that home builders cite at most coveted in today's design mix.

Original to the circa ’70s home, the family room features vaulted ceiling with European style beams, a stacked stone fireplace, and soaring windows.  All are elements that home builders cite as most coveted in today’s design mix.

“This house was probably ahead of its time in many ways. And, like many classic homes, it utilized beautiful design and integrated the surrounding property into nearly every facet of the home,” says Dianne Daniel Christian, owner of the boutique real estate firm Daniel-Christian Real Estate who is listing the 5,095 square foot home.

Built in the early ’70s by the current homeowner’s mother, the house is located on lush, rolling hills in Arrington. The house was designed to showcase the outside vista, nearly every window has a breathtaking view that is almost art-like.

This home, located on seven acres and adjoins a Land Trust, offers "art" in the view from nearly every window.

This home, located on seven acres and adjoins a Land Trust, offers “art” in the view from nearly every window.

“This is the home that you would almost hate to hang art in. How can you compete with the view?,” laughs Christian, who says the home and seven-acre property adjoin a Land Trust, ensuring privacy and a beautiful view.

The current homeowners loved the soaring, vaulted ceiling and use of natural materials that was used in creating the home in the ’70s. So when they decided to add on to the house, they mimicked much of the same architectural style, another testament to the enduring design.

“Many times, homeowners will create an addition to a home and you can tell where the old house footprint starts and the new one begins. Because this house was so clean and elegant in design, the addition of an upgraded kitchen and master suite on the main floor is nearly seamless,” explains Christian.

The home features a kitchen that rivals a commercial, restaurant kitchen, but somehow manages to feel homey. With

The home features a kitchen that rivals a commercial restaurant kitchen, but somehow manages to feel homey. With two built-in Sub-Zero refrigerators, two wine coolers, three ovens and two dishwashers in the kitchen and adjacent butler’s pantry, the house has hosted 100 friends and family at Thanksgiving. 

The addition included a custom kitchen that rivals an upscale restaurant. Unlike a commercial kitchen, however, this kitchen still feels homey and comfortable.

“The kitchen has two separate islands, two separate Sub-Zero refrigerators with freezer drawers. Two wine coolers and, if you include the butler pantry area, three ovens, and two dishwashers. It sounds like it would be overwhelming, but it is done so well, it still feels like a home,” says Christian.

For Christian, who has lived in Williamson County all of her life, that juxtaposition of every amenity in a setting that isn’t ostentatious, is a rarity. And a delight.

The home has every amenity you can imagine including custom closets with adjoining washer and dryer, a steam shower and heated Travertine tile in the master bath.

The home has every amenity you can imagine including custom closets with adjoining washer and dryer, a steam shower and heated travertine tile in the master bath.

“I grew up in this area. I love seeing a home that has every imagined feature to create comfort for those who call it home. But it isn’t a house that is over-the-top or showy. It is still inviting and peaceful,” says Christian.

Inviting is a word that friends and family of the current owners often use to describe the home as well. Christian says the homeowners often hosted parties and regularly had 100 guests at Thanksgiving.

The home is, at once, luxurious and still warm and inviting. A rarity according to Diane Christian, owner and realtor with boutique firm Daniel-Christian Real Estate.

The home is, at once, luxurious and still warm and inviting. A rarity according to Diane Christian, owner, and realtor of the boutique real estate firm Daniel-Christian Real Estate. Christian is the listing agent for this Arrington home. 

“Who wouldn’t want to be invited to a party here? You pull in the drive and just exhale. Living here would be like living in a wonderful resort. Except the resort is also the place you call home,” says Christian with a smile.

For a house built in an era often dubbed as the worst decade for design ever, standing the test of time is nearly unheard of. But this Arrington home is proof that classic design and spectacular surroundings trump 1970s style hands down.

 

For more images of the home, including a garage that was created to restore vintage cars, click here.