By CATHI AYCOCK

You know the difference between a traditional wedding dress and a modern gown, and choose the dress based on the style you want evoked at your wedding.  But do you know the (wildly) different styles that storytelling, curated creative and portraiture photography bring to your wedding day?

Choosing a photography style for your wedding is as important as choosing the style of your wedding dress. And since the images for you big day last longer than the memories of what sort of cake you served or what song you danced your first dance to, doing your research is a must.

Wedding photography has changed dramatically. A bride might love the storytelling aspect of candids and want half of all of the photos to be very journalistic. And she might want a formal portrait style for only her and the groom for framing. Knowing the different styles of photography can help the couple create images that are perfect for them.

Experts will be sharing tips on choosing a wedding photographer at the upcoming Say Yes Bridal Event at Dillard’s at CoolSprings Galleria.

Action shots require specific equipment, while a more stylized photo means a different interaction. Just choosing photos based on looking on Pinterest doesn’t mean you will end up with those pictures. Communicating with a photographer, and choosing a photographer who can execute whatever style you love is key.

Below are the three photography styles that you need to know to help you create wedding photos that are perfect for you.

Storytelling Photos
Do you want lots of action shots? Your cousins line dancing, the groomsmen laughing and toasting the groom. These spontaneous, candid images are documentary style photos. Rarely posed, the subjects rarely know they are being photographed.

Key in storytelling photos? Make sure you give your photographer an overview of what areas you especially want candid photos of. The dance floor, the head table at the reception or other areas. Most of the time a good photographer will cover the key spots, but if you have a particular interest in telling the story of, say, how guests interact at the build your own sundae bar, make sure you communicate. Storytelling isn’t scripted, but it should be defined.

Images that feel real time are shot without the subjects awareness that they are being photographed. These images feel candid and in the moment. Image from Pinterest.

Images that feel real time are shot without the subjects’ awareness that they are being photographed. These images feel candid and in the moment. Image from Pinterest.

 

This photo style is storytelling, real time documenting of the wedding day. Nothing is staged and the images are funny, tender and less stylistically polished than the other photo styles.

Curated Creative Photos
Do you want to make sure your family members and wedding party are in the photos in a clear, concise way? Want to ensure your side of the family, including long lost cousins, is documented?  Want a fun photo of all of the bridesmaids and another of all the groomsmen? Today, these curated photos are one of the biggest trends in wedding photos.  While photos with specific groups were once considered traditional portraiture (think your parent’s wedding album) today they are often more lighthearted and creative.

A creative photo that includes a curated group, this style is fun and allows the bride to ensure every important person is in at least one photo. Image from Pinterest.

A curated creative photo that includes a curated group, this style is fun and allows the bride to ensure every important person is in at least one photo. Image from Pinterest.


Think photos that have a loose theme. All of the groomsmen, for example, shot with an informal vibe. The groomsmen might be standing casually with arms thrown across each others shoulders outside the church, versus standing shoulder to shoulder at the altar of a church.

Props are often used in creative photos. Image from Pinterest.

Props are often used in curated creative photos. Image from Pinterest.

Props can also play a role in curated creative photos. A blackboard with a short blurb written on how each bridesmaid met the bride might be front and center with the the bridesmaids hugging the bride clustered around is curated creative.

Portraiture 
The most traditional of all wedding photo styles, the portrait style stands the test of time. Portraiture is elegant and classic photography. Lighting is crucial and editing is often used to create a near art-like image. While traditional may seem boring, remember that this classic style will look amazing on your 50th anniversary. The photos are usually highly stylized, and sometimes are shot in studio prior to the wedding.

Stylized and nearly art-like, a stylized wedding photo is classic and beautiful. Image from Pinterest.

Stylized and nearly art-like, a stylized wedding photo is classic and beautiful. Image from Pinterest.

The portrait style can sometimes be  more time consuming according, but the results are worth the effort.

No matter which style you choose, and a mix is usually the norm, couples should do their homework so that they can enjoy the wedding day via photos for decades.

 

Want more wedding planning information–and the chance to win $500 in Kate Spade Home and your entire Kate Spade registry?  The Say Yes Bridal Event is Saturday, June 25 at Dillard’s at Cool Springs Galleria from 1-4 pm. Sips, nibbles, giveaways and a bevy of wedding experts to help you plan your perfect day.